6.24.16

My secret tip for a silky-smooth pudding: Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding

I had this pudding for dessert at lunch about twenty years ago and never forgot it. The lunch was at a restaurant called “An American Place” in New York City, owned by Larry Forgione. His cookbook, by the same name, had just been published and I bought a copy that day at the restaurant. The chef signed my book with this: “Celebrating the flavors of America”, which pretty much describes the concept of the restaurant. All of the food was good but I was focused on the desserts like this chocolate pudding. Later, when I opened the book, I went directly to the chapter titled simply “Old-Fashioned Desserts”. I felt extremely lucky when I discovered that the recipe for Old-Fashioned Double Chocolate Pudding was included. But there was more: Blackberry and Apple Crisp, Old-Fashioned Strawberry Shortcake (since it’s strawberry season, this will be my next post). Apple Pandowdy, and Granny’s Chocolate Cake, just to name a few. I’ve made a lot of fancy desserts in my career, but these truly old-fashioned desserts really grab me, right in the heart, and just beg me to make them. Guess I’m just an old-fashioned girl.

 

Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding

Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding

 

 

Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding

Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding

 

My chocolate pudding recipe is adapted from that recipe, although it has been tweaked over the years, primarily to make it more chocolate-y by adding a teensy bit more cocoa powder and chocolate. I like a chocolate pudding to be shiny, glossy, and silky-smooth on the tongue. From making it so many times as a pastry chef, I stumbled onto the secret to getting this result and it is this:

 

icons-tip

USE A HAND BLENDER:
JUST BEFORE SERVING OR PUTTING INTO RAMEKINS, USE A HAND-BLENDER TO EMULSIFY THE PUDDING. THIS IS THE SECRET TIP THAT WILL PRODUCE THAT SHINY, SILKY TEXTURE. THE BOWL ON THE LEFT IS BEFORE BLENDING; THE TEXTURE IS ROUGH. THE BOWL ON THE RIGHT SHOWS THE SILKY-SMOOTH TEXTURE THAT YOU GET BY USING THE HAND BLENDER.

Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding

Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding

 

 

 

Procedure for making Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding:

 

This recipe is a winner and I can pretty much guarantee that it will be a success every time your make it if you follow the tip above. It is a recipe that is great served in individual ramekins for lunch−or dinner−or anytime as a snack, with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate shavings; a fresh raspberry doesn’t hurt. This pudding is also good for cake fillings, as in Shirl’s Brooklyn Blackout Cake.

I found a New York Times restaurant review by William Grimes from August 18, 1999 about “The American Place”. In it, regarding the desserts, he makes this very colorful comment: “The wisest course is to order the double chocolate pudding. Served with Schrafft’s sugar cookies, it’s a standout, one of those regressive treats that are as satisfying as a trashy novel.” I agree that it’s very satisfying. Please try it; you will love it.

 

Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding: Create a Pretty Presentation

 

Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding

Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding
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AUTHOR:
I had this pudding for dessert at a lunch about twenty years ago and never forgot it. The lunch was at Larry Forgione's "An American Place Restaurant" in New York City. His cookbook had just been published and I bought a copy that day at the restaurant. I felt extremely lucky when I opened the book and discovered that the recipe for Old-Fashioned Double Chocolate Pudding was included. This is a recipe that is great for individual servings in ramekins, (I like to use 4-ounce square ramekins) but is also good for cake fillings, as in Shirl's Brooklyn Blackout Cake.

YIELD: EIGHT 100g (3½ oz) SERVINGS
FINISHED WEIGHT: ABOUT 800g (28 oz)

INGREDIENTS

  • 240 grams milk (1 cup)
  • 180 grams ½ & ½ cream (3/4 cup)
  • 90 grams heavy cream (1/4 cup + 2 Tablespoons)
  • 50 grams sugar (1/4 cup)

  • 50 grams egg (1 large)
  • 60 grams egg yolks (3 large)
  • 60 grams milk (1/4 cup)

  • 50 grams sugar (1/4 cup)
  • 20 grams cornstarch (2 Tablespoons)
  • 15 grams cocoa powder (2½ Tablespoons)
  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt

  • 100 grams semi-sweet chocolate, chopped (Ghiradelli)
  • 40 grams bittersweet chocolate, chopped (Ghiradelli 60%)
  • 30 grams unsalted butter, cut in small pieces
  • 10 grams Myers's dark rum (2 teaspoons)
  • 10 grams vanilla extract (2 teaspoons)

  • 1005 grams = Total 35 oz (2# 3 oz)
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. COMBINE first four ingredients in a medium rondeau (or Dutch oven) and bring up to a boil.
  2. WHISK whole egg, egg yolks, and milk in a medium bowl until blended. In a separate bowl, whisk together the sugar, cornstarch, cocoa powder, and salt; then whisk the dry ingredients into the eggs.
  3. TEMPER the hot milk/cream into the egg mixture. Return to the pan and cook until the mixture thickens and comes to a low boil, whisking constantly. Let the mixture boil for about 2 minutes to cook the starch.
  4. REMOVE from heat, add the chopped chocolate, butter, rum, and vanilla extract; stir with whisk until the chocolate and butter are completely melted.
  5. PASS through a tamis or fine mesh strainer immediately into a stainless steel bowl and press plastic wrap directly onto the surface to prevent a skin from forming.
  6. COOL in ice bath to room temperature. The pudding will continue to thicken as it cools. Refrigerate overnight.
  7. MIX pudding with a hand blender until very smooth and shiny before using or serving. Don't omit this step; it makes a big difference in the texture, making it very silky.
  8. TO SERVE: POUR warm pudding into ramekins or cups. For 4-ounce ramekins, it will take about 100g (3½ oz) per ramekin. Top with whipped cream and chocolate shavings. Add a fresh raspberry (dusted lightly with powdered sugar), to each ramekin, if desired.
  9. TO USE FOR CAKE FILLING: Scale pudding into portions according to the number of layers in your recipe and the size of the cake. See scale below.
  10. CHOCOLATE PUDDING SCALE FOR CAKE LAYERS - For each layer, scale the pudding as follows: 6" (15 cm) CAKE = 100g (3½ oz) - 8" (20 cm) CAKE = 200g (7 oz) - 9" (23 cm) CAKE (23 cm) = 250g (8¾ oz) - 10" (25 cm) = 300g (10½ oz).
Recipe Ancestry Notes:
Recipe adapted from An American Place Cookbook by Larry Forgione (1996).
 

Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding

Old-Fashioned Chocolate Pudding

Thanks for stopping by. Enjoy!

Shirl